Author

Allison Winter

Allison Winter

Allison Winter is a Washington D.C. correspondent for States Newsroom, a network of state-based nonprofit news outlets that includes the Michigan Advance.

U.S. Supreme Court justices cast doubt on affirmative action in college admissions

By: - October 31, 2022

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Supreme Court’s conservative majority on Monday questioned the legality of race-conscious policies in college admissions, as the justices weighed two cases that could upend the admissions process many colleges use to try to boost diversity on campus.  At issue are two cases that challenge the lawfulness of affirmative action at Harvard […]

hogs on a farm

Farm bill season arrives: What’s the outlook for 2023?

By: - August 11, 2022

WASHINGTON — Over the course of the next year, lawmakers on the U.S. House and Senate Agriculture committees will draft a new federal farm bill that will shape food, farm, conservation and nutrition programs across the country for the next five years. The omnibus law that began 90 years ago as crop supports now has […]

vials of insulin

As insulin costs soar, diabetics say a $35 cap on co-pays is not enough

By: - June 14, 2022

WASHINGTON — Lacy Mason was a 21-year-old graduate student in Atlanta when she started rationing her insulin. As a Type 1 diabetic, she needs to take insulin every day for survival. But when the cost surged to $960 a month, Mason could no longer afford it. She had aged out of Medicaid and her student […]

computer ethernet broadband cable

Louisiana among 4 states picked for federal grants to expand affordable high-speed internet

By: - June 7, 2022

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Treasury Department on Tuesday announced the first state awards will go to Virginia, Louisiana, New Hampshire and West Virginia in a massive federal effort to bring affordable, high-speed internet to all American homes and businesses.  Projects in the four states are the first to receive funding as part of a $10 billion […]

U.S Supreme Court

Upcoming U.S. Supreme Court cases could curb colleges’ use of affirmative action

By: - March 30, 2022

The court recently agreed to hear two cases that challenge race-conscious admissions programs at Harvard University and the University of North Carolina, the nation's oldest private and public universities.

A streetcar rolls past a voting precinct in New Orleans.

U.S. Senate Republicans again block debate on voting rights legislation

By: - October 20, 2021

WASHINGTON — U.S. Senate Republicans blocked the advance of voting rights legislation Wednesday, the second time this year—thwarting again Democrats’ attempts to pass federal protections for voters amid a slew of new state elections laws.  “When we are faced with a coordinated effort across our country to limit the freedom to vote, we must stand […]

Democrats seek support services for survivors of Native American boarding schools

By: - August 24, 2021

WASHINGTON — Democratic lawmakers are pushing federal agencies to provide support for survivors of and communities affected by American Indian boarding school policies, the decades-long practice of forcibly sending Native American children to faraway boarding schools that rejected their tribal cultures. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Rep. Sharice Davids (D-Kansas) sent a request this month […]

Endangered species to get a reprieve under Biden administration plans

By: - June 21, 2021

WASHINGTON — The lesser prairie-chicken, a rare dancing grouse once abundant on the Great Plains, could benefit again soon from the protection of the U.S. government. So could the rusty patched bumblebee, a black-headed pollinator that at one time ranged from Georgia to Maine and across the Midwest. The Biden administration is rewriting how it […]

Granholm vows to create new jobs, cleaner solutions as Energy secretary

By: - January 28, 2021

WASHINGTON — Former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm told lawmakers Wednesday she would be “obsessed” with creating new jobs if confirmed as the next secretary of the Energy Department.  Granholm at her Senate confirmation hearing talked up the potential for new clean energy jobs— an effort to assuage concerns about potential job losses in the fossil […]

Biden’s presidency could open doors for environmental justice in Louisiana

By: - November 11, 2020

WASHINGTON —  The incoming Biden administration is poised to bring a new focus to environmental justice—a major policy change that could have an impact in Louisiana. Community activists and some Democratic lawmakers have long sought federal protections for environmental justice. They want to give low-income communities more latitude to challenge the cumulative effects from air, […]

Louisiana’s ‘Cancer Alley’ highlighted at congressional forum as an example of pollution’s deadliness

By: - September 17, 2020

WASHINGTON —Louisiana activists are calling on Congress to bolster environmental justice protections at the federal level, in advance of a key vote in Congress next week.  House Natural Resources Committee Chairman Raul Grijalva (D-Ariz.) heard from the environmental justice advocates at an online forum Thursday on Louisiana’s “Cancer Alley,” part of a virtual “tour” with […]

Steve Scalise

‘This is personal to me’: Scalise calls for more law and order on opening night of RNC

By: - August 24, 2020

WASHINGTON — Louisiana Republican Steve Scalise made a case for Donald Trump as a law and order president who will bolster law enforcement, in remarks Monday at the opening night of the Republican National Convention. Scalise, the House minority whip and second-ranking Republican in the House of Representatives, was one of the prime-time speakers in […]